Kitchen Cabinet Hardware – Perfect For Any New Or Remodeled Decor

When purchasing cabinet hardware for the first time, you might get a little intimidated by all the options that are available. Basically, there are five main options to choose from and the first one and most well known one is knobs. Another main type is pulls, which are also known as handles. The third main type is drop pulls that are also installed by using two screws. Cup pulls are the fourth main type of cabinet hardware and they too are installed by using two screws. Like the other pull options, they can be installed on both cabinet drawers and furnishings. The final main cabinet hardware option is back plates. This fixture is designed to be placed between the cabinet or drawer and the knob or pull that you have purchased.

So, now that you know about the different hardware types, you are all set to go and purchase them for your cabinetry.

You might not think it, but having the right kitchen cabinet hardware installed on your kitchen cabinets can really make or break the look of your space. Even with the best of quality cabinets in a new or remodeled space, cheap or hardware that is “just wrong” will destroy the efforts you put into the room. So, you see the importance of going with the right kitchen cabinet hardware and here is a simple guide on how to do just that. When purchasing kitchen cabinet hardware, the main thing that you need to do, is take notice at what type of look and feel that your space has; and then carry that further with your hardware selection. Once you have determined the decorative style of your space, then you can start shopping for the perfect styles and designs – all of which are readily available online.

Basically, kitchen cabinet hardware is offered in a wide variety of styles and this is great for you because then you can effortlessly find ones for your space. And, if you do not have self closing cabinets, then you will also need door catches. Now, this guide cannot only be applied for purchasing kitchen hardware because you can also use when looking for hardware for other cabinetry throughout your home as well.

More often than not, the furniture isn’t carrying the style in a room, it is actually is the hardware cabinet fixtures that you have installed on it, like pulls and knobs. These material and finishing options create fixtures of all different styles, and shapes, perfect for installing on the cabinets in any kitchen or bathroom. Other hardware cabinet fixtures include those of the contemporary variety, others that have more of a traditional feel, and some that are even more on the country side ideal for placing on the cabinets in a cottage.

One great way to check out all the fantastic hardware cabinet fixtures that are available is by just hopping on the internet. Make sure to get some hardware cabinet fixtures today so you can enjoy the lovely new appearance of your cabinetry tomorrow.

Author Jennifer Akre is an owner of a wide variety of online specialty shops including that offer both items and information on how you can easily furnish and decorate your space. Whether it is cabinet hardware [http://www.eknobsandpulls.com] for your bathroom or kitchen cabinet hardware [http://blog.eknobsandpulls.com] for your new or remodeled decor. Design tips you can use to make those spots both functional and beautiful. Click today and indulge your senses.

How to Restore Old Wooden Furniture

Wood furniture is the most common element of furniture that is passed down from generation to generation. You wouldn’t probably receive your grandma’s plastic serving pieces or an old fishing pole from your great grandpa, but a 100-year-old wooden dining table is more likely to appear in your home. Wood can withstand the passing of time from generation to generation. Not only does it provide a piece of family history, but it has its own story to tell to anyone who dines around it for years to come.

However, with the passing of time and regular use from previous generations, it is likely an heirloom wooden furniture piece is in need of some TLC. Here are four simple options to restoring old wooden furniture that will make it look just as beautiful as the day it was purchased.

1. Staining wood. Staining is a quick and simple way to even out discolorations on the surface that shows the furniture’s age. Whether you’re staining it back to the original color or going a few shades darker, it is amazing what a coat or two can do to transform an old piece of wood furniture.

2. Removing stains and discolorations. If you’re not ready to make the commitment of a total re-stain, a removal of stains and discoloration will make the furniture appear cleaner without losing any of the original colorings. The most common types of stains include white spots, ink stains, wax and gum spots and blushing. It is important to remember to only work as deep as the affected area and retain as much of the original stain color as possible.

3. Repairing Cracks. If your wooden furniture is old, chances are there is some cracking on the surface of the wood. Repairing cracks is a simple way to transform a piece of furniture back to its original state. There are various types of wood fillers and putties that can be applied to achieve a restored look.

4. Replacing hardware. Replacing the old existing hardware on furniture is probably the simplest restoration technique to transform your furniture. Most likely, any hinges, handles, drawer pulls or ornamental elements on an heirloom piece are scratched, worn or dysfunctional. Adding new hardware will automatically update any piece without losing the vintage effect on the wood.

It is important to constantly be treating any signs of generational wear and tear on an old piece of furniture. Chances are you won’t be the last person to use and love the piece, so keeping it in good condition for the next inheritor is important to the longevity of your furniture.

Furniture Care and Preservation

Weather Changes

Wood is very sensitive to water and changes in relative humidity. As the weather changes from season to season, so does the humidity in your home and also the moisture content of your wood furniture. This situation causes the wood to expand and contract with every change in the humidity. The purpose of the finish is to minimize the effects of moisture changes by sealing the wood. Wood likes moderate conditions of around 65 to 75 degrees Fahrenheit with a relative humidity of around 45 percent to 55 percent. Most homes today have air handling systems that provide a humidifier in winter to add moisture when the air is “dry” and an air conditioner in summer to remove moisture when the air is “wet”. If you do not have this optimum condition but keep the temperature and humidity steady, even if they are to high or to low, it is much better than frequent and/or sudden changes. Furniture can deteriorate quickly if stored in a basement (high moisture), attic (high heat), garage or non -climate controlled storage units or warehouses (continual changing conditions). Excess heat and dryness can cause wood to split and/or crack. Keep your furniture away from all direct heat sources like radiators, wood stoves and air ducts. If you need to put your furniture near a heat source, use a shield or diverter to deflect or direct heat away. Wood is most likely to check (crack) when the climate in your home suddenly changes from hot and humid to cold and dry. Frequent and sudden changes in humidity and temperature are especially bad.

Here are a few suggestions for dealing with humidity:

Furniture can best handle temperature and humidity changes when they occur gradually. Sudden changes like opening a vacation home, or putting items into non-climate controlled storage in winter directly from your warm home can be problems for your furniture.
When air conditioning your home, it is best to keep the intake of outside humid air to a minimum. Don’t open the windows to “air out” the house on fair days.
Add a humidifier or vaporizing unit to your heating system to help stabilize the humidity level during the cold dry months of winter.
Use dehumidifiers in damp rooms and during prolonged rainy seasons to remove excess moisture from the air.

Sunlight

The ultraviolet light rays from the sun will damage finishes and bleach the stain and wood underneath. Prolonged exposure to sunlight can cause the finish to crack, sometimes in a pattern resembling the looks like cracked glass. Try to keep furniture out of direct sunlight. When that’s not possible, reduce the amount of light streaming on any piece of furniture. Use window shades, drapes or blinds to block direct sun light during the time of day the furniture is exposed. The use of UV screening films will dramatically reduce long term bleaching effect and are well worth the investment. Uniformly expose surfaces to light. Avoid letting the sun hit only part of a surface. Occasionally move lamps, doilies and other objects so the wood bleaches uniformly. Cover furniture with sheets or blankets if you leave your home for several months at a time. Move your furniture around periodically so that the same piece is not exposed to light all the time. However, some bleaching can be desirable. Antique collectors actually look for the rich, soft tones that fading can bring, particularly on Walnut and Rose Wood.

Cleaning

Carefully choose wood care products. There is a lot of confusion about what wood-care products to use. Store shelves are stacked with countless brands of wax, polish, spray and oil. Clever marketing techniques, tell us to use there product because it “feeds” the wood while it cleans and protects it too. Unless your furniture is unfinished, or the finish has deteriorated and worn off, when you clean your furniture you’re actually cleaning the finish, not the wood. There is absolutely no way for any cleaning product to “feed” or “nourish” the wood because the wood is sealed and protected by the finish. Proper care will prolong the life of a finish. Waxing the finish makes the surface of furniture slippery so that objects slide along it without scratching and dust will not stick. The wax protects the finish and the finish protects the wood. To clean, simply wipe with a soft lent free, damp (not wet) cloth. Be careful using water to clean wood. Water is wood’s worst enemy. Wood should never get wet or soaked. Water can cause swelling, warping or satins if it penetrates a finish. Most finishes are water resistant, not water proof. Use coasters, pads, cloths or runners to protect against spills and water rings. Consulting a professional before cleaning valuable antiques and heirlooms.

Dusting

What’s the best way to care for my furniture? Ask five different people, and you’ll get five different answers. But most “experts” agree on a some basics. First of all, remember your mother is always right: Dust frequently. Keep away from feather dusters. They just move dust around, flinging it into the air, moving from one item to the next. Broken quills have sharp edges and could scratch the finish. Some types of dust are abrasive so infrequent dusting can create worn and dull surfaces over the years. Dust can accumulate in carvings, cracks and grooves and look an unattractive “gray”. This dusty buildup eventually becomes hard to remove. This “gray” look is often imitated by finishers using wax mixed with pumice or rotten stone powders to make an item look aged (Aren’t we clever!).

Use a clean, washable cloth made of soft, lint-free cotton. My favorites are cotton diapers, old T-shirt, or any soft cotton fabric. When using old clothing be sure to remove all hooks, snaps, buttons and zippers that could scratch surfaces. Don’t use a rag that has loose threads or unraveling edges. These can catch on wood splinters, moldings or loose veneer and pull them off.

Dusting with a dry cloth is abrasive and will ultimately dull the finish. A dry cloth will not really remove much dust. Sprinkling a few drops of water onto the dusting cloth. The trick is to moisten the cloth just enough to make dust adhere to it. The cloth should not be so damp that it wets the finish (leaving water streaks). If you can see any trace of water on the wood after you wipe, your cloth is to wet. Do not use any spray-on dusting aids or polish. Most of them contain water with an emulsifier to suspend some kind oil, or contain silicones. This type of oil is used in most commercial furniture sprays and polishes.

Hardware For Furniture Upholstery

Hand-forged, stamped and machine-cut iron tacks, pins, wire nails, staples and other hardware such as clips, hooks, clamps, braces, snaps and zips are used to attach layers of upholstery, and support systems to frames.

Eighteenth-century tacks have hand-forged iron shanks and hammered heads sometimes referred to as ‘rose head’. However, this term is also used to describe some machine-made types and should therefore be avoided as confusing. By the late eighteenth century the process had developed further – shanks were machine-cut but the heads were still hammered by hand. It was not until the early nineteenth century that the heads were machine-stamped. Today upholstery tacks are generally blued cut steel and of two types, fine and improved, the latter being slightly heavier with a larger head. They have a small spur of metal used for temporary tacking and can be used with a magnetic tack hammer. Professional upholsterers commonly kept sterilized tacks in the mouth, from where they could be quickly and easily spat onto the magnetic head, temporarily placed and then driven home with the hammer head, thus keeping one hand free to hold material. Clout tacks have burred shanks to increase the anchor into the wood. Gimp pins are small thin nails, enamelled or lacquered in a range of colours, that are used to attach gimp braid, fringes and exposed backs of outer covers. They were known in the late eighteenth century as copper pin nails. Today they are generally of fine cut steel. Small wire nails have been used for the same purpose.

Since mechanization in the closing years of the eighteenth century, tacks have become plentiful and comparatively cheap. More are therefore used in so-called traditional upholstery as currently practised than were used in preindustrial age furniture and this may cause more damage to the frame. It is a common misconception that traditional upholstery (using hand-built industrial age upholstery techniques) is more authentic and less damaging to the frame than modern application techniques. Staples properly delivered from electric or pneumatic guns probably cause less stress to the frame than tacks hammered in by hand, though the staple is used by most manufacturers of commercial furniture for reasons of economy. Also, modern techniques usually involve the application of a complete preformed unit which only requires the application of a single row of metal fasteners to secure it to the frame. This contrasts with hand-built techniques where each separate layer of the multilayered structure is attached to the frame with a separate row of metal fasteners. Metal fasteners are available in a variety of sizes, gauges and metals.

Standard sizes of wire from which commercially available fasteners are derived conform to certain recognized gauges (e.g. Birmingham Wire Gauge), but this differs internationally (e.g. metric, Imperial, USA). Some are plated either for decorative purposes or to increase their resistance to corrosion. Generally speaking, the larger tacks and staples are used to hold webbing, the smallest and finest to hold the top cover. Metals include iron, steel and copper alloys. Close examination of tacks and nails may indicate the type of manufacturing process. Features to look for include tapered and non-tapered shanks, uniform sizes and shapes, surface burrs and striations, gripper die marks and metal type. These features may indicate techniques of manufacture and may suggest a date. For example, uniform sizes with flashes may suggest casting whilst identical features may indicate machine manufacture.